POTENTIALS OF BAMBUSA V. VULGARIS (BAMBOO) BIOMASS AS FEEDSTOCK TO PRODUCE OF BIOFUELS

Energy is needed for heating, cooking, lighting and transport activity.
The world’s energy depends heavily on fossil fuel and fuelwood (Klass, 2004)
 
Problems associated with burning fossil fuel include; it

- is non-renewable (Klass, 2004; Saxena et al., 2007)

-releases Greenhouse gases which has brought about Climate  change (Kyoto Protocol, 1997; Riché et al, 2009).
-
The world’s consumption of wood fuel in 2016 amounted to 1863 million m3 an increase of 2% compare to 2015 (1770 million m3) and 11% compare to 1575 million m3 in 1980 (FAOSTAT, 2017).
 
The energy sector in Ghana is dominated by wood fuel and charcoal (UNDP 2004).
 
 
STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM
 
The burning of fossil fuels have brought climate change such as global warming, flooding, droughts and famines and water shortages, extreme heat (World Bank, 2009).
 
Rural households in Ghana used 75% firewood and 16% charcoal for cooking. (National Population Census of Ghana 2010).
 
Consumption of fuelwood and wood charcoal has brought land degradation, soil erosion and desertification.
 
Global concern about climate change led to the establishment of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UN FCCC) in 1992.
        
Researchers suggested biomass energy as alternative (IEA 2010). Biomass provides clean and renewable energy source which generates far less air emissions than fossil fuels.
Countries like Brazil, Canada and US were using sugar cane, wheat, corn or soya respectively to produce bioethanol (BRDB, 2008; Koh & Wilcove, 2008)
Food crops used for biofuels have adverse effects

    - on food supply to human, poultry and farm animals

    - on food prices (Sun and Cheng, 2002)

Bamboo is a reliable substitute for crops and wood materials to produce biofuels for heat, electricity and transportation (Scurlock et al, 2000; Ganesh, 2003)
Type of Work: 
Thesis
Stage: 
Ongoing